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HomePoems > Kubla Khan > Sources > William Bartram > 7. Manatee Springs                           

 

 

1. The Serpentine Rivulet

2. Isle of Palms

3. Gordonia Lasianthus

4. Swelling Green Knoll

5. Crystal Fountain

6. Subterranean River

7. Manatee Springs

8. Alligator Hole

William Bartram:

7. Manatee Springs

Reflecting on the fountain in Kubla Khan, Lowes argues that "The vision is an amazing confluence of images from these separate yet closely linked reports of actual fountains which Coleridge had read." 370.

Near a description of an alligator hole, Bartram describes a place called the Manatee Spring, mentioning the force that threw water up through rocks, tossing around particles of shells, and then the brief pauses, when the surface settled, intermittently.

Bartram stresses the regular alternation between furious bursts, and brief moments of calm.

Coleridge's fountain, too, is forced out of the rocks, with "swift half-intermitted burst," but in his handling, we see huge fragments vaulting, and the water makes whole rocks dance.

Bartram's fountain, then, is smaller in scale, less dramatic, but similar in action.

Bartram stresses that this activity is continual, regular, and perpetual, and Coleridge does echo that impression when he talks about the fountain as flinging up the river "at once and ever," seething in "ceaseless turmoil."

What makes the association psychologically fit, then, is not the verbal echoes, but the similarity of point.

Other sources

William Beckford
F. Bernier
James Bruce
Thomas Burnet
William Collins
Herodotus
Athanasius Kircher
Jerome Lobo
Thomas Maurice
John Milton
Pausanias
Samuel Purchas
Major James Rennell
Seneca
Strabo
Virgil

Mary Wollstonecraft

 

Text

The ebullition is astonishing, and continual, though its greatest force or fury intermits, regularly, for the space of thirty seconds of time…

The ebullition is perpendicular upwards, from a vast ragged orifice though a bed of rocks

throwing up small particles or pieces of white shells, which subside with the waters, at the moment of intermission….

Yet, before the surface becomes quite even, the fountain vomits up the waters again, and so on perpetually. --Bartram, 231. 

 
Word Line # Line Sources for word
Ceaseless

17

And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething

 Bartram 5
 Bartram 7

 Bernier 4

Forced

19

A mighty fountain momently was forced

 Bartram 7
 Bernier 2
 Bruce 3
 Bruce 7
 Kircher 1
 Strabo 2

Fountain

19

A mighty fountain momently was forced

 Bartram 4
 Bartram 5
 Bartram 6
 Bartram 7
 Bartram 8
 Beckford
 Bernier 2
 Bernier 4
 Bruce 1
 Bruce 2
 Bruce 3
 Burnet 1
 Herodotus
 Maurice 2
 Milton 4
 Pausanias
 Rennell
 Seneca 1
 Virgil
 Wollstonecraft

 

34

From the fountain and the caves

 Bartram 4
 Bartram 5
 Bartram 6
 Bartram 7
 Bartram 8
 Beckford
 Bernier 2
 Bernier 4
 Bruce 1
 Bruce 2
 Bruce 3
 Burnet 1
 Herodotus
 Maurice 2
 Milton 4
 Pausanias
 Rennell
 Seneca 1
 Virgil
 Wollstonecraft

Half-intermitted

20

Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst

 Bartram 5
 Bartram 7
 Bernier 4

Momently

24

It flung up momently the sacred river

Bartram 7
Bruce 2
Rocks

23

And ‘mid these dancing rocks at once and ever

 Bartram 5
 Bartram 6
 Bartram 7
 Bartram 8

 Bruce 2
 Bruce 7

 Collins
 Milton 6
 Wollstonecraft
 

   

 

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